The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Movie Tie-in Edition) (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard)

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Movie Tie-in Edition) (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard)

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Movie Tie-in Edition) (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard)

Stieg Larsson’s #1 bestselling mystery featuring Lisbeth Salander is now a major motion picture directed by David Fincher, starring Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara, from Columbia Pictures/Sony. In theaters December 2011. The first volume in the Millennium Trilogy, and an international publishing sensation, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo combines murder mystery, family saga, love story, and financial intrigue into one satisfyingly complex and entertainingly atmospheric novel.Amazon Best of the Mont

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March 07 2012 01:09 am | Uncategorized

3 Responses to “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Movie Tie-in Edition) (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard)”

  1. K. M. "literary devotee" Says:
    2,315 of 2,492 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    This Swedish bestseller deserves to be a blockbuster here too., August 25, 2008
    By 
    K. M. “literary devotee” (California) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      

    A 24-year-old computer hacker sporting an assortment of tattoos and body piercings and afflicted with Asperger Syndrome or something of the like has been under state guardianship in her native Sweden since she was thirteen. She supports herself by doing deep background investigations for Dragan Armansky, who, in turn, worries the anorexic-looking Lisbeth Salander is “the perfect victim for anyone who wished her ill.” Salander may look fourteen and stubbornly shun social norms, but she possesses the inner strength of a determined survivor. She sees more than her word processor page in black and white and despises the users and abusers of this world. She won’t hesitate to exact her own unique brand of retribution against small-potatoes bullies, sick predators, and corrupt magnates alike.

    Financial journalist Carl Mikael Blomkvist has just been convicted of libeling a financier and is facing a fine and three months in jail. Blomkvist, after a Salander-completed background check, is summoned to a meeting with semi-retired industrialist Henrik Vanger whose far-flung but shrinking corporate empire is wholly family owned. Vanger has brooded for 36 years about the fate of his great niece, Harriet. Blomkvist is expected to live for a year on the island where many Vanger family members still reside and where Harriet was last seen. Under the cover story that he is writing a family history, Blomkvist is to investigate which family member might have done away with the teenager.

    So, the stage is set. The reader easily guesses early that somehow Blomkvist and Salander will pool their talents to probe the Vanger mystery. However,Swede Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is no humdrum, formulaic whodunit. It is fascinating and very difficult to put down. Nor is it without some really suspenseful and chillingly ugly scenes….

    The issue most saturating The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is that of shocking sexual violence primarily against women but not excluding men. Salander and Blomkvist both confront prima facie evidence of such crimes. Larsson’s other major constituent elements are corporate malfeasance that threatens complete collapse of stock markets and anarchistic distrust of officialdom to the point of endorsing (at least, almost) vigilantism. He also deals with racism as he spins a complex web from strands of real and imagined history concerning mid-twentieth century Vanger affiliations with Sweden’s fascist groups.

    But Larsson’s carefully calibrated tale is more than a grisly, cynical world view of his country and the modern world at large. At its core, it is an fascinating character study of a young woman who easily masters computer code but for whom human interaction is almost always more trouble than it is worth, of an investigative reporter who chooses a path of less resistance than Salander but whose humanity reaches out to many including her, and of peripheral characters — such as Armansky — who need more of their story told.

    Fortunately, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo in English translation will be followed by two more in the Millennium series: The Girl Who Played with Fire, and The Air Castle that Blew Up. I can’t wait. Larsson also made a 200-page start on a fourth book, but sadly he succumbed to a heart attack in 2004 and his father decided the unfinished work will remain unpublished.

    I recommend this international bestseller to all who eagerly sift new books for challenging intellectual crime thrillers, who luxuriate in immersing themselves in the ambience of a compellingly created world and memorable characters, who soak up financial and investigative minutiae as well as computer hacking tidbits, and who want to share Larsson’s crusade against violence and racism.

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  2. R. Crane Says:
    598 of 703 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Best Book of the Year, September 13, 2008
    By 
    R. Crane (Washington, DC United States) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What’s this?)

    The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is a masterwork of fine craftsmanhip. When I reached the final page I was disappointed that there was no more to read. I did not want the story to end. The characters are too intriguing for this to be the end. Apparently this was the first novel in a trilogy by the brillant writer, Stieg Larsson, who unfortunately died in 2004: the book contains a tribute to him and his career. I cannot wait to read the sequels scheduled for release in the USA in 2009.

    The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is an international best seller and is set in Sweden. It takes a little effort to get accustomed to all the Swedish names and places but then the story moves with lightening speed. There are two key plots happening simultaneously. In one, a Swedish financial investigative journalist publishes a libelous attack about a powerful industrialist and is sentenced to jail, fined a ruinous sum, and has his career torn to shreds. Another industrialist, Vanger, hires the journalist to investigate the 36 year old disappearnace of his then 14 year old grand niece. There has been no trace of her in all these years and she is assumed dead. Yet, every year on his birthday, he receives a mysterious gift of a pressed flower, mimicking a gift his missing grandniece used to give him when she lived there. Vanger, an old man, is tormented by the flower gifts, and wants one more chance to find out what happened to her and who killed her. What the journalist uncovers about the Vanger family’s hitherto unknown secrets and connections to the Nazis, will have you hanging on the edge of your seat.

    The book is titled after yet another character, Lisabeth Salander, a societal outcast and social ward of the State, uncivilized without any desire to obey societal norms, and replete with piercings, tattoos, and a goth/biker appearance. In short, at first glance a totally undesirable and unsympathetic person. She is a researcher with a corporate security firm and ends up working with the journalist. In truth, she is a survivor of abuse in all forms with low self esteem, and an inablity to trust. She is a genius with Asberger’s Syndrome, a form of autism, who sees patterns in things ordinary mortals miss and uses incredible computer hacking skills to accomplish her goals. She is fascinating: ruthless and tough to a fault, yet internally vulnerable, struggling to comprehend her own feelings. She has an appeal that draws you to her, rooting for her, and wanting to understand her. Lisabeth is unforgettable, unlike most characters that populate mystery thrillers. There is such depth here.

    The book is a thriller on many levels: The story about the Vanger family itself, the journalist’s crusade to redeem his reputation, Lisabeth’s vendettas and development, and of course, the truth about what actually happened to the missing Vanger heiresss. This is a superb novel and impossible to put down. Utterly stunning. Probably the year’s best book. SUMMER 2009: SEE MY REVIEW OF THE SEQUEL, “THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE”, ANOTHER OUTSTANDING BOOK.

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  3. A. Grace Says:
    102 of 118 people found the following review helpful:
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    I missed something, didn’t I., December 7, 2009
    By 
    A. Grace (Michigan) –
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    I keep trying to figure out *how* this Swedish crime novel became an international bestseller. Yes, the decades-old case of the missing niece prodded me to reach the final page, though not with bated breath. Yes, Lisbeth Salander (young, tattooed, socially challenged, incompetent-per-the-State hacker) makes a readable heroine; too bad she’s given fewer pages than the alleged hero. But other than the mystery subplot and Salander herself, almost every element of this work falls short, astonishingly so given the multitude of five-star reviews.

    Within these too numerous (465) pages, you’ll find flat, artless prose; rampant description (rooms, every article of furniture therein, multiple walk-throughs of characters’ daily routines); and clinical interior monologue. You’ll be treated to graphic scenes of sexual assault (realism in fiction is one thing; gratuitous detail is another). You’ll meet a main character (Mikael Blomkvist) defined by extreme passivity, unfettered libido, and frequent cluelessness. You’ll wade through endless exposition on the Vanger family history. You’ll probably find yourself interested in one or more of the plot threads, yet continually frustrated at their fragmented presentation.

    I agree with other reviewers that the book should have retained its Swedish title (MEN WHO HATE WOMEN). This better fits the social commentary Larsson clearly intended; it better warns of the disturbing sexual themes; and it doesn’t falsely promise us much page time with Salander, the only sympathetic character in the book. However, even with a more accurate title, this novel’s runaway success would confound me. I guess it was brilliantly marketed.

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